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Main article: Online food ordering

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Topics from 1 to 10 | in all: 64

Instacart gets into ready-to-eat food deliveries with build your own sub service

12:52 | 28 January

Grocery picking service Instacart is dabbling with on-demand food delivery, announcing the launch in Florida of a pre-made meals delivery option that shoppers can tag onto a bigger supermarket order.

It’s partnering with US supermarket chain Publix for the initial launch of Instacart Meals — offering what it dubs a “digital deli counter” where app users can build their own sub and have it picked up and delivered alongside a grocery order.

“We know that when customers grocery shop, they’re thinking about both the food they need for the week in addition to what’s for dinner that night,” it writes in a blog post announcing Instacart Meals.

It says the service will be rolling out to Publix locations across Florida “in the coming weeks”, and to “nearly all Publix stores across the Southeast in the months ahead”.

“We see the highest volume of orders placed on the Instacart marketplace between 2 and 4pm and at less than half the price of an average fast-casual food order, made-to-order grocery meals offer access to a fresh, easy and more affordable option when life is hectic and dinner is soon,” it adds.

Instacart says the meals product integrates with existing grocery order management systems to generate what’s touted as “precise preparation and counter pickup windows at the end of the Instacart shopper’s shopping route”.

“This ensures that the customer’s sandwich gets from the store to their door as fresh as possible,” it adds.

Although quite how long a ready-to-eat sandwich might end up waiting around getting soggy before it’s picked up and delivered to the customer as lunch is one question. (As fresh “as possible” is a pretty open-ended promise.)

It’s notable that Instacart is touting the premade meals service as a price competitive option vs an “average fast-casual food” — presumably such as those a consumer might order via an on-demand food delivery app such as PostMates or Uber Eats.

So “more affordable” seems likely to translate to ‘not as quickly as those kind of services’ — but, hey, you’re getting cheaper eats.

Instacart also makes a point of noting that the pre-made meals feature will automatically apply any relevant deals vis-a-vis the rest of the shopping cart — so that app users will get “all applicable combo options and discounts”, just as an in store shopper would.

The move is the latest sign of the category overlap going on between on-demand food delivery and grocery delivery services, as startups in the space search for ways to cross-sell existing users on additional products that can boost the unit economics, per delivery.

Spain’s Glovo, for example, has expanded from on-demand food delivery into running its own dark supermarkets — where it stocks and sells (via app only) a limited selection of groceries which can be tagged onto a ready-to-eat food order. Though it’s also focused on very fast delivery as the differentiating factor for this ‘Super Glovo’ service, and does partner with select supermarkets for larger grocery deliveries.

Instacart, meanwhile, looks to be hoping to gobble some of the lunch of on-demand food delivery app rivals by being able to undercut them on price, as the meals are coming from supermarket deli counters not a standalone fast food brand. So speed of delivery can be handled as a secondary consideration.

Instacart Meals is the latest product expansion from the company — which, in recent years, has been building out an alcohol delivery service. It is also piloting prescription deliveries with Costco in select states.

The company has a network of 350 partner retailers operating 25,000+ stores across more than 5,500 cities in the U.S. and Canada — from which it could seek to build out the pre-made food offer.

Earlier this month Instacart announced upgraded pick-up options.  The business has come under fire for how it compensates the army of professional shoppers who do picking and delivering of orders.

 


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Glovo exits the Middle East and drops two LatAm markets in latest food delivery crunch

18:00 | 21 January

The new year isn’t even a month old and the food delivery crunch is already taking big bites. Spain’s Glovo has today announced it’s exiting four markets — which it says is part of a goal of pushing for profitability by 2021.

Also today, Uber confirmed rumors late last year by announcing it’s offloading its Indian Eats business to local rival Zomato — which will see it take a 9.99% stake in the Indian startup.

In other recent news Latin America focused on-demand delivery app Rappi announced 6% staff layoffs.

On-demand food delivery apps may be great at filling the bellies of hungry consumers fast but startups in this space have yet to figure out how to deliver push-button convenience without haemorrhaging money at scale.

So the question even some investors are asking is how they can make their model profitable?

Middle East exit

The four markets Glovo is leaving are Turkey, Egypt, Uruguay and Puerto Rico.

The exits mean its app footprint is shrinking to 22 markets, still with a focus on South America, South West Europe, and Eastern Europe and Africa.

Interestingly, Glovo is here essentially saying goodbye to the Middle East — despite its recent late stage financing round being led by Abu Dhabi state investment company, Mubadala. (It told us last month that regional expansion was not part of Mubadala’s investment thesis.)

Commenting on the exits in a statement, Glovo co-founder and CEO, Oscar Pierre, said: “This has been a very tough decision to take but our strategy has always been to focus on markets where we can grow and establish ourselves among the top two delivery players while providing a first-class user experience and value for our Glovers, customers and partners.”

Last month Pierre told us the Middle East looks too competitive for Glovo to expand further.

In the event it’s opted for a full exit — given both Egypt and Turkey are being dropped (despite the latter being touted as one of Glovo’s fastest growing markets just over a year ago, at the time of its Series D).

“Leaving these four markets will help us to further strengthen our leadership position in South West and Eastern Europe, LatAm and other African markets, and reach our profitability targets by early 2021,” Pierre added.

Glovo said its app will continue to function in the four markets “for a few weeks” after today — adding that it’s offering “support and advice to couriers, customers and partners throughout this transition”.

“I want to place on record our thanks to all of our Glovers, customers and partners in the markets from which we’re withdrawing for their hard work, dedication, commitment and ongoing support,” Pierre added.

The exits sum to Glovo withdrawing from eight out of a total 306 cities.

It also said the eight cities collectively generated 1.7% of its gross sales in 2019 — so it’s signalling the move doesn’t amount to a major revenue hit.

The startup disclosed a $166M Series E raise last month — which pushed the business past a unicorn valuation. Pierre told us then that the new financing would be used to achieve profitability “as early as 2021”, foreshadowing today’s announcement of a clutch of market exits.

Glovo has said its goal is to become the leading or second delivery platform in all the markets where it operates — underlining the challenges of turning a profit in such a hyper competitive, thin margin space which also involves major logistical complexities with so many moving parts (and people) involved in each transaction.

As food delivery players reconfigure their regional footprints — via market exits and consolidation — better financed platforms will be hoping they’ll be left standing with a profitable business to shout about (and the chance to grow again by gobbling up less profitable rivals or else be consumed themselves). So something of a new race is on.

Back in November in an on-stage interview at TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin, Uber Eats and Glovo discussed the challenges of turning a profit — with Glovo co-founder Sacha Michaud telling us he expects further consolidation in the on-demand delivery space. (Though the pair claimed there had been no acquisition talks between Uber and Glovo.)

Michaud said then that Glovo is profitable on a per unit economics basis in “some countries” — but admitted it “varies a lot country by country”.

Spain and Southern Europe are the best markets for Glovo, he also told us, confirming it generates operating profit there. “Latin America will become operation profitable next year,” he predicted.

Glovo’s exit from Egypt actually marks the end of a second act in the market.

The startup first announced it was pulling the plug on Egypt in April 2019 — but returned last summer, at the behest of its investor Delivery Hero (a rival food delivery startup which has a stake in Glovo), according to Michaud’s explanation on stage.

However there was also an intervention by Egypt’s competition watchdog. And local press reported the watchdog had ordered Glovo to resume operations — accusing it and its investor of colluding to restrict competition in the market (Delivery Hero having previously acquired Egyptian food delivery rival, Otlob).

What the watchdog makes of today’s announcement of a final bow out could thus be an interesting wrinkle.

Asked about Egypt, a Glovo spokesperson told us: “Egypt has been a very complex market for us, we were sad to leave the first time and excited to return when we did so last summer. However, our strategy has always been to be among the top two delivery players in every market we enter and have a clear path to profitability. Unfortunately, in Egypt there is not a clear path to profitability.”

Whither profitability?

So what does a clear path to profitability in the on-demand delivery space look like?

Market maturity/density appears to be key, with Glovo only operating in one city apiece in the other two markets it’s leaving, Uruguay and Puerto Rico, for example — compared to hundreds across its best markets, Spain and Italy, where it’s operating out of the red.

This suggests that other markets in South America — where Glovo similarly has just a toe-hold, of a single or handful of cities, and less time on the ground, such as Honduras or Panama — could be vulnerable to further future exits as the company reconfigures to try to hit full profitability in just around a year’s time.

But there are likely lots of factors involved in making the unit economics stack up so it’s tricky to predict.

Food delivered on-demand makes up the majority of Glovo’s orders per market but its app also touts being able to deliver ‘anything’ — from groceries to pharmaceuticals to the house keys you left at home — which it claims as a differentiating factor vs rival food-delivery-only apps.

A degree of variety also looks to be a key ingredient in becoming a sustainable on-demand delivery business — as scale and cross selling appear to where the unit economics can work.

Groceries are certainly a growing focus for Glovo which has been investing in setting up networks of dark supermarkets to support fast delivery of convenience style groceries as well as ready-to-eat food — thereby expanding opportunities for cross-selling to its convenience-loving food junkies at the point of appetite-driven (but likely loss-making) lunch and dinner orders.

Last year Michaud told us that market “maturity” supports profitability. “At the end of the day the more orders we have the better the whole ecosystem works,” he said.

While Uber Eats’ general manager for Northern and Eastern Europe, Charity Safford, also pointed to “scale” as the secret sauce for still elusive profits.

“Where we start to see more and more trips happening this is definitely where we see the unit economics improving — so our job is really to figure out all of the use cases we can put into people’s hands to get that application used as much as possible,” she said.

It’s instructive that Uber is shifting towards a ‘superapp’ model — revealing its intent last year to fold previously separate lines of business, such as rides and Eats, into a single one-stop-shop app which it began rolling out last year. So it’s also able to deliver or serve an increasing number of things (and/or services).

The tech giant has also been testing subscription passes which combine access to a range of its offerings under one regular payment. While Glovo launched a ‘Prime’ monthly subscription offering unlimited deliveries of anything its couriers can bike around for a fixed monthly cost back in 2018.

When it comes to the quest for on-demand profitability all roads so seem to lead to trying to become the bit of Amazon’s business that Amazon hasn’t already built out and swiped.

 


0

Spain’s Glovo grabs $166M Series E for its ‘deliver anything’ app

11:00 | 19 December

Spain’s Glovo, an on-demand delivery app platform which operates in Europe, LatAm and Africa delivering food but also other urban conveniences from groceries to pharmaceuticals, has bagged another €150 million (~$166M) in a fast-following Series E round led by Abu Dhabi state investment company, Mubadala.

The raise follows a €150M in Series D that was announced in April, and $134M in Series C in mid 2018. The total raised since the business was founded back in 2015 is now around $488M.

The Barcelona-based startup says the latest raise has pushed its valuation past $1BN — putting it into a very exclusive Spanish unicorn club, with the likes of ride-hailing giant Cabify. (Glovo reckons it’s only the second privately held business in the country to achieve such a valuation).

Co-founder Oscar Pierre would not disclose the exact valuation investors are putting on the business now — beyond publicly acknowledging the unicorn milestone. “We’ve decided not to disclose valuation,” he said. “Even internally, all these valuation things it’s not something we care a lot about… Crossing the billion, I guess, is something worth announcing but not more details.”

Glovo’s new investor, Mubadala, is investing from a $400M fund announced earlier this year for backing European startups — which is itself backed by Japanese conglomerate, Softbank. Mubadala was also a backer of Softbank’s Vision Fund. (And the latter has made some very big bets in the on-demand delivery space, ploughing funding into DoorDash in the US and Rappi in Colombia to name two.)

Asked whether Glovo sees opportunities for expansion in the Gulf region in light of Mubadala joining its investor roster, Pierre said: “It hasn’t been part of the thesis of investment — so we’re not linking it.”

Glovo’s market focus remains fixed on three core regions where it currently operates: South America, South West Europe, and Eastern Europe and Africa — the strategy having been to target regions where competitors hadn’t already established themselves as the go-to on-demand delivery platform.

“Middle East for us it seems already a bit too competitive to go now,” he told us. “All our expansion playbook has been focused on going first to markets… [or where our competitors] were a second player. And the online food delivery market in Middle East is very developed already.

“So, never say never, but short answer is we’re not planning in the short term to launch there.”

Speaking in an on stage interview at TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin last week, Glovo’s other co-founder, Sacha Michaud, suggested the hyper competitive on-demand food delivery market is set for more consolidation in the short term. Though he said Glovo’s team will be head down “aiming for profitability” — rather than looking to go shopping for growth by buying rivals (or indeed being bagged themselves).

Pierre also told us the focus for the business in 2020 — now flush with Series E cash — will be achieving profitability. He said it’s hoping to achieve that in a little over a year’s time.

“Our plan is to use this money to go fully profitable as a company during early 2021,” he told TechCrunch. “I think that’s quite realistic. Still with a very high growth. So we’re expecting more than 2x-2.5x growth during next year.”

“Today we operate in 26 markets. And many of them are still in early stage, and they’re still in investment phase so I think first of all we’re going to use this money to take most of our countries to the positive operational profit stage,” he went on. “Our model is one where during the first 18 months you need to invest in a city — because you need to build the right capillarity, the right efficiency to start generating positive profits.”

Glovo launched its service in around eight new countries during 2019, per Pierre.

Which means there’s plenty of investment that still needs to go in to those markets over the coming year to bring them up to the required density to tilt for profitability.

So it looks likely that it will step off the gas a little on its blistering pace of growth and market expansions next year — as it puts more effort on deepening its footprint to push for the scale required to tip into positive margins.

Although Pierre also suggested there “might be a few new countries” it will ride into next year — noting, too, that it will have a larger marketing budget in 2020 vs this year.

“The rate of new cities that we’re currently launching is very high. Probably every week we keep launching at least ten cities — Italy for example has already like 60 cities launched and we think we can go to more than 200 so there’s a lot of cities still to penetrate,” he said. “We’ve had very good results in some African or Eastern European countries like Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Georgia. And there’s some similar markets that we could go to. [There are also examples] in Africa, like Ivory Coast. It’s been a great success.”

“We do expect a lot,” he added. “2019 on relative terms [growth] was very high. It was like 3.5x. It’s very hard to maintain that growth with the current size that we have but it’s still going to be very high — it’s probably going to be 2x-2.5x”

A big chunk of Series E funding will be ploughed into expanding Glovo’s engineer team — with a plan to hire around 300 additional developers by mid 2020. This will build on the circa 150 devs it already employs in Barcelona and a new tech hub it’s building out in Warsaw.

As a whole the business employs 1,500+ staff at this point — not including the thousands of self-employed couriers (who it calls ‘Glovers’) who make the deliveries — but 2020 will see it significantly grow headcount, with both up to 300 more engineers being added and potentially even more hires related to running the ‘dark stores’ it’s planning to significantly ramp up next year too.

Asked why this on-demand delivery business is so tech intensive Pierre said it’s all about eking out small gains to reduce friction and yield incremental savings by automating and optimizing platform and UX interactions which — cumulatively — make the difference for this type of thin margins business.

“Overall there’s a lot of complexity in what we do. So we deliver anything in your city in 30 minutes. And in this 30 minutes you need to co-ordinate a lot of things. A lot of things have to go well, like the restaurant or the store has to receive well information, they need to receive well the preparation time to get that ready, of course all the logistics and all the routing and the despatching of the orders with the couriers needs to work very well, and then the front end for the user — it’s an industry where there’s a lot of competition and we’re all developing better and better features. So that also has to work out very well.”

“If we had 400 engineers there’s many more specialized [product] teams that we would build,” he added. “On the other end we are by definition a super high volume, low margin business — and next year we’re talking about doing more than 100M orders, maybe close to 200M orders next year. Which means that you optimize every single order by 20 cents, which seems nothing in a €20 basket, and you’re generating €40M extra and a bit there. And most of the efficiencies — they come through tech.”

Groceries will be the other big focus for Glovo in 2020, with Pierre noting the category is it’s second biggest, after food (i.e. restaurant meal) deliveries.

Since 2018 Glovo has experimented with opening a handful of so-called ‘dark stores’ in key cities — such as Madrid and Barcelona. These are delivery-pick-up-only warehouses for convenience store style grocery shopping — be it toothpaste, snacks or soft drinks — with stores strategically sited to ensure speedy delivery across a city.

It has around seven cities with dark stores operational now, according to Pierre. The plan is to launch over 100 more of these ‘Super Glovos’ (as it calls them) in 2020 — focusing on larger cities.

“We are building our own dark stores and it’s a model that we like a lot,” he told us. “We think it works everywhere. So far we have basically been rolling it out in our biggest cities. And we’re going to keep with that focus.

“What we’re very focused on now is making sure that the biggest cities, we have enough capillarity of dark stores to guarantee super fast delivery time. And for us super fast delivery time means 15 minutes. So that’s what we’re focusing on… Before launching more cities we’re very focused on how do we guarantee this 15 minute delivery time.”

As noted above, ramping up on groceries will also add headcount to the business. Pierre confirmed the stores are staffed by employees — and said between four to five people are needed per store to work as packers and store managers. So that’s potentially another 500 staff Glovo will be adding to its books next year.

It also partners with supermarket giant Carrefour to offer full supermarket shopping on-demand via the app in select markets. But it sees dark stores as supplementary to that partnership model — playing to the push-button convenience its business encourages.

And — again with an eye on profitability — providing opportunities for cross selling to bulk up order size.

The dark store play piggybacks on convenience, using the fixed delivery fee as a lever to encourage users to add a few more staple items to an urgent shopping need, because, well, they might feel bad if they shell out to just get a bottle of mixer brought to their door. (Super Glovos stock a limited range of items (<1,000 SKUs) to help keep delivery times down.)

“There’s a lot of people that order because they need something very urgently — like for tonight, and since they’re ordering maybe four or five items I think we do a pretty good job at cross-selling and adding more,” said Pierre. “So it’s pretty basic things but that people need… tonight, tomorrow and maybe the day after that. They don’t do the big basket.

“In Super Glovo you can find things like oranges, potatoes, bananas. We have started selling some meat in some markets — like simple burgers. Actually we tested selling Impossible Burgers in Barcelona. But most of it is not perishable — like 90%.”

“We believe that the best for the user is to have both,” he added, discussing dark stores vs supermarket partnerships. “To have a very fast, 15 minute, more like convenience option and also offer them maybe one or two great retailers, like Carrefour — maybe for larger baskets or for their unique brands. I think that’s the best user experience possible.”

Beyond food, courier services will be another area of product focus for Glovo in 2020, per Pierre.

“Surprisingly enough there’s a lot of people that use us for courier,” he said.” Like I forgot my keys or just send some documents from point A to point B. This is a service where we want to improve our product a lot because it does take a lot of orders.”

But that’s just about going to be the limit. He suggested Glovo will have limited resources to fully implement some of the other stuff it’s experimenting with (or has plans to) — as it works towards its overarching vision of becoming an ‘everything app’ for urbanities. Because thin margins like plentiful orders.

For example, he said it’s currently testing its own brand on-demand scooters in Argentina.

“Our users in Buenos Aires there’s 500 scooters — yellow painted Glovo scooters in the streets — and they can use them with the same Glovo account. It’s a test for us to learn about a new industry and stuff.”

“Here in Barcelona we are looking at the possibility to sell ticketing — like last minute tickets for cinema, for theatres, for football matches,” he added. “And of course sell digital tickets not printed tickets. So we like everything that gets the user closer to their city and makes it basically easier. And we’re going to be testing things but I think not rolling out, scaling massively.

“We have a mentality of testing things. But we don’t think we’re going to have resources during 2020 to do a full rollout.”

Asked what he sees as the end game for Glovo if, as he hopes, it achieves profitability in 2021– whether it’s an IPO or exit via acquisition — Pierre said the team is focused on staying independent, however that can be achieved.

“We’re very focused on that point where we can basically decide our future. More or less investor independent. I think we can reach that,” he suggested. “And then decide what we want to do. Glovo’s one of these projects that it’s so fun and there’s so much entrepreneurship in terms of launching new services and verticals. The reality is that’s, for us, very important — and we don’t see ourselves doing anything else.

“So I think our dream would be stay as independent. Maybe IPO. It’s a tool for us to give liquidation to all our shareholders and employees. But it’s not a goal per se. We have 18 months to be profitable, depend on us, and keep having a very big impact.”

 


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China Roundup: Y Combinator’s short-lived China dream

19:00 | 23 November

Hello and welcome back to TechCrunch’s China Roundup, a digest of recent events shaping the Chinese tech landscape and what they mean to people in the rest of the world. Last week, we looked at how Alibaba and Tencent fared in the last quarter; the talk in Silicon Valley and Beijing this week is on Y Combinator’s sudden retreat from China. We will also discuss the enduring food delivery war in the country later.

Brief adventure in the East

The storied Silicon Valley accelerator Y Combinator announced the closure of its China unit just a little over a year after it entered the country. In a vague statement posted on its official blog, the organization said the decision came amid a change in leadership. Sam Altman, its former president who hired legendary artificial intelligence scientist Lu Qi to initiate the China operation, recently left his high-profile role to join research outfit OpenAI. With that, YC has since refocused its energy to support “local and international startups from our headquarters in Silicon Valley.”

What was untold is the insurmountable challenge that multinationals face in their attempt to win in a wildly different market. Lu Qi, who wore management hats at Baidu and Microsoft before joining YC, was clearly aware of the obstacles when he said in an interview (in Chinese) in May that “multinational corporations in China have almost been wiped out. They almost never successfully land in China.” The prescription, he believes, is to build a local team that’s given full autonomy to make decisions around products, operations, and the business.

A former executive at an American company’s China branch, who asked to remain anonymous, argued that Lu Qi’s one-man effort can’t be enough to beat the curse of multinationals’ path in China. “All I can say is: Lu has taken a detour. Going independent is the best decision. When it comes to whether Chinese startups are suited for mentorship, or whether incubators bring value to China, these are separate questions.”

What’s curious is that YC China seemed to have been given a meaningful level of freedom before the split. “Thanks to Sam Altman and the U.S. team, who agreed with my view and supported with much preparation, YC China is not only able to enjoy key resources from YC U.S. but can also operate at a completely independent capacity,” Lu said in the May interview.

Moving on, the old YC China team will join Lu Qi to fund new companies under a newly minted program, MiraclePlus, announced YC China via a Wechat post (in Chinese). The initiative has set up its own fund, team, entity and operational team. The deep ties that Lu has fostered with YC will continue to benefit his new portfolio, which will receive “support” from the YC headquarters, though neither party elaborated on what that means.

Alibaba’s food delivery nemesis

The food delivery war in China is still dragging on two years after the major consolidation that left the market with two major players. Meituan, the local services company backed by Tencent, has managed to attain an expanding share against Alibaba-owned Ele.me. According to third-party data (in Chinese) provided by Trustdata, Meituan accounted for 65.1% of China’s overall food delivery orders during the second quarter, steadily rising from just under 60% a year ago. Ele.me, on the other hand, has lost nearly 10% of the market, slumping to 27.4% from 36% a year ago.

In terms of monetization, Meituan generated 15.6 billion yuan ($2.2 billion) in revenue from its food delivery segment in the quarter ended September 30. That dwarfs Ele.me, which racked up 6.8 billion yuan ($970 million) during the same period. Both are growing north of 30% year-over-year.

meituan dianping

Source: Meituan

This may not be all that surprising given Alibaba has arguably more imminent battles to fight. The e-commerce leader has been consumed by the rise of Pinduoduo, which has launched an assault on China’s low-tier cities with its ultra-cheap products and social-driven online shopping experience. Meituan, on the other hand, is fixated on beefing up its main turf of on-demand neighborhood services after divesting its costly bike-sharing endeavor. 

When both contestants have the capital to burn through — as they have demonstrated through heavily subsidizing customers and restaurants — the race comes down to which has greater control of user traffic. Meituan holds a competitive edge thanks to its merger with Dianping, a leading restaurant review app akin to Yelp, back in 2015. Dianping today operates as a standalone brand but its food app is deeply integrated with Meituan’s delivery services. For example, hundreds of millions of users are able to place Meituan-powered food delivery orders straight from Dianping.

Alibaba and Meituan used to be on more friendly terms just a few years ago. In 2011, the e-commerce giant participated in Meituan’s $50 million Series B financing. Before long, the two clashed over control of the company. Alibaba is known to impose a heavy hand on its portfolio companies by taking up majority stakes and reshuffling the company with new executives. That’s because Alibaba believes that “only when you operate can you generate synergies and really create exponential value,” said vice chairman Joe Tsai in an interview. Whereas if you just make a financial investment, you’re counting an internal rate of return. You’re not creating real value.”

Ele.me lived through that transformation. As of September, Alibaba has reportedly (in Chinese) completed replacing Ele.me’s management with its pool of appointed personnel. Ele.me’s founder Zhang Xuhao left the company with billions of yuan in cash and joined a venture capital firm (in Chinese).

Meituan’s founder Wang Xing had more unfettered pursuits. In a later financing round, he refused to accept Alibaba’s condition for portfolio companies to eschew Tencent investments, a strategy of the giant to hobble its archrival. That botched the partnership and Alibaba has since been gradually offloading its Meituan shares but still held onto small amounts, according to Wang in 2017, “to create trouble” for Meituan going forward.

 


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Deliveroo launches food orders for pick up

14:02 | 11 November

Don’t Deliveroo . The UK-based on-demand food delivery service has expanded into not actually delivering orders by offering users a pick-up option, called ‘Pickup’, as an alternative to paying a delivery fee and waiting in for lunch to arrive.

The new ‘click & collection’ service is live for 700+ eateries in 13 UK cities at launch: Aberdeen, Birmingham, Cardiff, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, London, Manchester, Milton Keynes, Newcastle, Norwich, Nottingham and Edinburgh (Old Town). Restaurant brands signed up in the first wave include Byron, Pizza Express, Pizza Hut, TGI Friday’s, Frankie & Benny’s, Chiquito, Coast to Coast and Giraffe.

Deliveroo says it expects the pick-up service to grow rapidly, reckoning more than 10,000 restaurants will be offering it within the next 12 months — and doing so across the 200 UK towns and cities in which it currently operates. Albeit that’s just a prediction at this stage.

It’s not clear whether it also plans to add the ‘Pickup’ option in its international markets. (We’ve asked and will update if we get more.)

Deliveroo says the pick-up option is intended to widen customer choice with a cheaper option for users willing to collect a meal, potentially helping it to take a bite out of lunch money that could otherwise be spent at a supermarket.

At the same time it’s a way for the company to expand the order pipeline for restaurants that are signed up to its service — and in this scenario it’s acting merely as an ordering layer (but still taking a commission).

While customers picking up their own meals provides an additional revenue stream for Deliveroo’s platform that’s free from any legal or ethical risk attached to the employment status (and/or working conditions) of delivery couriers operating on its platform.

The pick-up option launch is the latest addition to a suite of b2b offerings Deliveroo serves up for signed up eateries.

These include a food procurement service; savings (badged as ‘perks’) on everyday business costs such as energy; a data service to support restaurant expansion; and ‘virtual brands’ — using demand data to feed new or complementary cuisines being offered from a restaurant’s existing kitchen.

Deliveroo says it expects growth for its business to step up sharply — anticipating signing up another 10,000 restaurants in the UK over the next 6 months, which would take the total it’s working with to 30,000.

It operates in 500+ towns and cities across 13 markets in all at this stage, including Australia, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Italy, Ireland, Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait as well as its home market of the UK.

Despite bullish talk of scale, the food delivery space remains highly competitive in many global markets.

This summer Deliveroo announced it was exiting the German market, saying it would refocus resources and investment to accelerate growth and expansion in other markets across Europe and APAC.

In Europe consolidation has been the name of the recent game — with dominant platforms under pressure to increase choice and service offering to try to maintain an edge in key markets.

Fast scaling in one market may be at the expense of any business at all in another.

Expansion into adjacent delivery markets is another strategy we’re seeing from regional on-demand delivery startups.

For example Spain’s Glovo is working on a ‘dark supermarkets’ model to fuel high speed local grocery deliveries, while also dabbling in regional expansion on the food delivery front, with a major push via acquisition into Poland.

 


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Glovo is opening a tech hub in Poland after gobbling a local food delivery rival

16:08 | 6 November

Barcelona-based on-demand delivery startup Glovo is beefing up its engineering capacity by opening a second tech hub, its first in Poland — with an initial plan to hire 40 additional engineers and have a total of 50 tech and product experts working predominantly out of its Warsaw office.

Glovo says it expects the Polish engineering hub to make up half of its technology capacity in time. It will have a main focus on developing user-facing features for its marketplace product and for partners operating on the platform, it adds.

It also has plans for further expansion of the facility down the line — and an overarching roadmap for its business of a 300-strong engineering team to support building out its on-demand service offering.

Its pitch is “everything” delivered on-demand, from fast food to groceries or pharmaceuticals, so long as it’s small and light enough to be handled by one of the couriers picking up jobs on its platform.

While there’s little doubt that fast food makes up the bulk of Glovo orders right now the startup has been trying to push into online grocery deliveries, to compete with giants like Amazon — including setting up its own warehouses capable of fulfilling orders within 20 minutes, 24 hours a day. (It calls these ‘dark supermarkets’ SuperGlovo — ‘super’ meaning ‘supermarket’ in Spanish. Though its ‘dark’ model has also attracted attention from Barcelona City Council for lacking a correct permit.)

In August Spanish media reported that Glovo had itself been shopping — picking up Polish food delivery platform, Pizza Portal, for an acquisition price-tag that’s billed as up to €35M (~$39M).

Glovo raised a $169M Series D back in April which included investment from Drake, owner of global pizza franchise Papa John’s — giving it the means and the motive to gobble smaller rivals in the food delivery space.

Poland being one of its existing markets in Europe. (Albeit Pizza Portal offers various types of fast food for delivery, not just pizza.)

In all, Glovo operates in more than 20 countries at this stage, though its densest markets of operation remain its home market of Spain and also Italy.

In Poland it operates in just eight cities — so the Pizza Portal acquisition looks intended to beef up its footprint there, with the latter slated as the largest food-service platform in the market — even as Glovo doubles down on expanding its engineering capacity by tapping up local tech talent.

At the same time, competition for on-demand delivery, and especially food delivery, remains fierce in Europe where a number of players — including the likes of Deliveroo, JustEat and Uber Eats, are battling it out for territory. And, in some instances, consuming each other to carve out a bigger share of lunch in key markets.

Where Glovo doesn’t operate in Europe highlights some of that ongoing food fight, with no offering in Germany or the UK, for instance. Its regional strategy focuses on the South and East. It has also been building up an international business, opening in markets in LatAm and the Middle East and Africa.

Scaling fast is certainly core to Glovo’s playbook, though. It says it launched in a new city every four days on average last year, while the 2015-founded startup now employs over 1,300 people in all.

Glovo founder Oscar Pierre will be joining us at TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin in December to chat about growing an on-demand delivery business — you can find out more about Disrupt conference passes here

 


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Very Good Security raises $35M in Series B in ‘zero data’ push

15:00 | 24 October

Data security startup Very Good Security, has raised $35 million in its latest round of funding.

Its Series B, announced Thursday, was led by Goldman Sachs, with participation from existing investors Andreessen Horowitz — which led its $8.5 million Series A round — and Vertex Ventures US.

Very Good Security’s offering is simple. Instead of other businesses and startups holding onto their own collected user data, Very Good Security stores it in its secured vault, and gives its business customers the tools to access, edit, and process it without any of the liability.

The company’s software-as-a-service offering replaces sensitive data, such as credit card numbers or medical information for example, with an aliased version. The data can used just like ordinary data but it’s unreadable to humans, rendering it useless to hackers in the event of a data breach or theft.

Businesses who sign up to the data security offering can say they’re “zero data,” a term Very Good Security uses to describe companies that don’t store their own data. The company says by storing data in its vaults and not their own makes it more difficult for attackers to steal user data, while relieving companies of the burden of having to maintain a secure data environment themselves.

It makes sense, given how startups especially are notoriously unfocused on security.

Mahmoud Abdelkader, co-founder and chief executive of Very Good Security, said his company helps other businesses and startups launch and grow while “offloading the risk that comes with data custodianship.”

The company said it will use the $35 million round to support its “rapid” growth as its customer base increases. To date, the company has enlisted Brex and Deliveroo as customers, indicating considerable trust in the platform.

 


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Deliveroo is exiting the German market

15:04 | 12 August

UK on-demand food delivery startup Deliveroo is pulling the plug on its service in Germany.

The startup expanded into the market more than four years ago. But in an email sent to users it writes that — “regrettably” — it will be exiting Germany on August 16.

“This was not an easy decision and one we have not taken lightly,” it adds, saying its focus will be on “growing our operations in other markets around the world”.

deliveroo german goodbye email

The company had already dialled back service in the market, shuttering services in a number of smaller German cities a year ago. At the time it said it would focus on Berlin, Munich, Cologne, Hamburg and Frankfurt.

A spokesperson for Deliveroo confirmed it’s complete exit from Germany, emailing TechCrunch the following statement:

We want to thank all of the riders and restaurants who worked with Deliveroo in Germany, as well our wonderful customers. It has been an honour to serve so many people amazing food from Germany’s many great restaurants and to work with so many brilliant, hard-working riders. We are grateful to our extremely talented employees for their commitment to bringing fantastic foods to people’s homes, and they will be supported in this period. Deliveroo will continue to grow and invest in markets across the world, seeking to become the world’s definitive food company.

The spokesperson added that Deliveroo intends to refocus resources and investment to accelerate growth and expansion in other markets across Europe and APAC — without specifying exactly where it plans to focus.

Support for riders and affected employees will include unknown levels of compensation and goodwill packages, according to information provided by Deliveroo.

It also said it does not ruling out returning to Germany in future, albeit it expressed a similar sentiment when it downsized its service footprint in the market last year.

At the time of its launch into Germany, back in April 2015, we wrote that Deliveroo would face “stiff competition”, noting for example that Berlin was already host to a range of local food delivery startups.

Competition in the on-demand food delivery space in Europe has raged fiercely for years — with very little to distinguish one delivery app from another, aside from price. Switching service is always just an app tap away.  But with consolidation now starting to eat into the market the temperature is rising.

At the end of last year another Deliveroo rival, Delivery Hero, ceded its entire business in Germany to Netherlands-based Takeaway.com — selling the unit for €930M.

While, late last month, UK-based Just Eat and Takeaway.com announced they were in advanced talks to combine their businesses. Their boards reached agreement on terms last week — with the deal set to be put to their respective shareholders before the end of the year.

Most likely that mega-merger is concentrating minds at Deliveroo. Competing for customers with a platform giant valued at $10BN+ certainly does not sound like a cake walk.

TechCrunch’s Steve O’Hear contributed to this report 

 


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Just Eat and Takeaway.com reach agreement to gobble each other

12:57 | 5 August

The boards of Just Eat and Takeaway.com have reached agreement to combine their two European food delivery businesses.

The pair of publicly listed companies announced they were in talks to combine their businesses a week ago, saying then that talks were at an advanced stage.

Today they said their boards have reached agreement on the terms of “a recommended all-share combination”, and both will be recommending unanimously that shareholders vote in favor of the merger at respective meetings.

Meetings to seek shareholder approval are to be held no later than 20 December, and the pair say they expect the merger to be completed in Q4, assuming shareholders give the green light.

“The Combination would create one of the largest food delivery companies in the world, with scale, strategic vision, industry-leading capabilities, leading positions in attractive markets and a diversified geographic presence,” they write in today’s note, adding that the merger has “compelling strategic logic” and represents “an attractive opportunity” for both to build on “the strong individual platforms of Just Eat and Takeaway.com with the potential to deliver substantial benefits to respective shareholders, consumers,  employees and other stakeholders”.

Commenting in a statement, Jitse Groen, CEO of Takeaway.com, also said: “The Combination of Just Eat and Takeaway.com creates one of the world’s largest and most powerful food delivery websites. It will become a formidable company that will make an impact on tens of millions of consumers across the globe; it will be at the forefront of product and tech development in the sector, and it will lead the way in its relationship with its consumers, restaurant partners, its staff, and its delivery drivers. It is a dreamed combination, created by the sector’s dream team, and I can only be grateful for the opportunity of leading it.”

In another supporting statement, Just Eat’s chairman Mike Evans added: “The Board believes that this is a compelling offer for Just Eat shareholders which will create a global leader in a dynamic and rapidly growing sector. Our businesses have a shared philosophy and culture, and together we will create one of the world’s largest online food delivery platforms with leading positions in key markets. With a significant commitment to the UK and to the employees of Just Eat, we believe the new combination and proven leadership team will allow us to better serve our millions of consumers and thousands of restaurant partners around the world. Just Eat will be a driving force in the creation of an exciting global leader and I am looking forward to working with Jitse and the talented Takeaway.com team to seize this opportunity together.”

Under the agreed terms, Just Eat shareholders will be entitled to receive 0.09744 Takeaway.com shares for each Just Eat share which they state implies a value for Just Eat of 731 pence per Just Eat share based on Takeaway.com’s closing share price on 26 July 2019 of €83.55 — representing a premium of 15% to Just Eat’s closing share price on 26 July 2019 (ahead head of the announcement of the merger talks).

While, following completion, Just Eat Shareholders will own approximately 52.15% and Takeaway.com Shareholders will own approximately 47.85% of the combined group — which is set to be called Just Eat Takeaway.com N.V., and will be headquartered in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands.

The pair say the current intention is to maintain “a number” of Just Eat’s current headquarter functions in London (they do not state how many or which), and “a significant part of its operations in the United Kingdom, including its existing operations in London, Borehamwood and Bristol”.

“A full assessment of the Combined Group’s other locations has not yet been conducted, and as a result, there are no specific plans in relation to these other locations,” they add.

A two-tier board structure is planned for the merged entity, with a management board and supervisory board, both of which will comprise a mix of members from the Takeaway.com boards and from the Just Eat board — including current Takeaway.com CEO Groen assuming the role of CEO of the combined group and Paul Harrison, the current CFO of Just Eat, taking up the CFO role for the merged entity, while Takeaway.com’s current CFO, Brent Wissink, will become co-COO of the combined group, along with Takeaway.com’s current COO Jörg Gerbig.

For the supervisory board, the plan is for current Just Eat chairman Evans to take the chairman role, while Adriaan Nühn, currently the chairman of the Takeaway.com supervisory board, will be vice-chairman and senior independent non-executive director.

The supervisory board will also comprise three independent non-executive members identified by Just Eat and two non-executive members identified by Takeaway.com.

The pair say approval will be sought for the listing and admission to trading of the enlarged share capital of the Combined Group on the Premium Segment of the London Stock Exchange’s Main Market for listed securities; and of the new Takeaway.com shares on Euronext Amsterdam; and inclusion of the Combined Group in the FTSE 100 Index and FTSE All-Share Index.

“Based on initial discussions with FTSE, Takeaway.com and Just Eat anticipate that the Combined Group would be eligible for inclusion in the FTSE 100 Index and the FTSE All-Share Index from completion of the Combination,” they add.

 


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Ordermark, the online-delivery order management service for restaurants, raises $18 million

22:51 | 29 July

Los Angeles-based Ordermark, the online delivery management service for restaurants founded by the scion of the famous, family-owned Canters Deli, said it has raised $18 million in a new round of funding.

The round was led by Boulder-based Foundry Group. All of Ordermark’s previous investors came back to provide additional capital for the company’s new funding, including: TenOneTen Ventures, Vertical Venture Partners, Mucker Capital, Act One Ventures, and Nosara Capital, which led the Series A funding.

“We created Ordermark to help my family’s restaurant adapt and thrive in the mobile delivery era, and then realized that as a company, we could help other restaurants experiencing the same challenges. We’ve been gratified to see positive results come in from our restaurant customers nationwide,” said Alex Canter, in a statement.

A fourth generation restauranteur, Canter built the technology on the back of his family deli’s own needs. The company has an integrated point of sale system, kitchen display, accounting tool, and integration with last mile delivery companies.

As the company expands it’s looking to increase its sales among the virtual restaurants powered by cloud kitchens and delivery services like Uber Eats, Seamless/Grubhub and others, the company said in a statement.

Although the business isn’t profitable, Ordermark is now in over 3,000 restaurants. The company has integrations with over fifty ordering services.

 


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