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Main article: Computer security

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A security mishap left Remine wide open to hackers

22:52 | 25 February

Security is all too often focused on keeping hackers out and breaches at bay. But in the case of Remine, a real estate intelligence startup, it left its doors wide open for anyone to run rampant.

Remine is a little-known but major player in the real estate analytics and intelligence market. It works by collecting and mining vast amounts of real estate data — from public listings to privately obtained data from brokers and real estate agents from across the United States. The company, which last year raised $30 million in its Series A to help expand its real estate data and intelligence platform, claims it has data “on 150 million properties across all 50 states.”

But that data was only a few clicks away from being easily accessible, thanks to a misconfigured system.

The misconfiguration was found in Remine’s development environment, which although protected by a password, let anyone outside the company register an account to log in.

Thinking it was a secure space, Remine’s developers shared private keys, secrets and other passwords, which if exploited by a malicious hacker would have allowed access to the company’s Amazon Web Services storage servers, databases and also the company’s private Slack workspace.

Mossab Hussein, a security researcher at Dubai-based cybersecurity firm SpiderSilk, found the exposed system and reported the findings to TechCruch so we could inform the company of the security lapse.

The exposed private keys, he said, allowed for full access to the company’s storage servers, containing more than a decade’s worth of documents — including title deeds, rent agreements and addresses of customers or sellers, he said.

One of the documents seen by TechCrunch showed personal information, including names, home addresses and other personally identifiable information belonging to a rental tenant.

After TechCrunch reached out, Remine co-founder and chief operating officer Jonathan Spinetto confirmed the security lapse and that its private keys and secrets have been replaced. Spinetto also said it has notified customers with a letter, seen by TechCrunch. And, the company has retained cybersecurity firm Crypsis to handle the investigation, and that the company will “assess and comply” with applicable data breach notification laws based on the findings of the investigation.

Remine escaped bruised rather than breached, a lesson to all companies, large and small, that even the smallest bug can be enough to wreak havoc.

Read more:


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Rallyhood exposed a decade of users’ private data

02:00 | 24 February

Rallyhood says it’s “private and secure.” But for some time, it wasn’t.

The social network designed to helping groups communicate and coordinate left one of its cloud storage buckets open and exposed. The bucket, hosted on Amazon Web Services (AWS), was not protected with a password, allowing anyone who knew the easily-guessable web address access to a decade’s worth of user files.

Rallyhood boasts users from Girl Scout and Boy Scout troops, and Komen, Habitat for Humanities, and YMCA factions. The company also hosts thousands of smaller groups, like local bands, sports teams, art clubs, and organizing committees. Many flocked to the site after Rallyhood said it would help migrate users from Yahoo Groups, after Verizon (which also owns TechCrunch) said it would shut down the discussion forum site last year.

The bucket contained group data as far back to 2011 up to and including last month. In total, the bucket contained 4.1 terabytes of uploaded files, representing millions of users’ files.

Some of the files we reviewed contained sensitive data, like shared password lists and contracts or other permission slips and agreements. The documents also included non-disclosure agreements and other files that were not intended to be public.

Where we could identify contact information of users whose information was exposed, TechCrunch reached out to verify the authenticity of the data.

A security researcher who goes by the handle Timeless found the exposed bucket and informed TechCrunch, so that the bucket and its files could be secured.

When reached, Rallyhood chief technology officer Chris Alderson initially claimed that the bucket was for “testing” and that all user data was stored “in a highly secured bucket,” but later admitted that during a migration project, “there was a brief period when permissions were mistakenly left open.”

It’s not known if Rallyhood plans to warn its users and customers of the security lapse. At the time of writing, Rallyhood has made no statement on its website or any of its social media profiles of the incident.

 


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How much should a startup spend on security?

03:34 | 21 February

One of the questions I frequently ask startup founders is how much they’re spending on security. Unsurprisingly, everyone has a different answer.

Startups and small companies are invariably faced with the prospect that they’re either not spending enough or are spending too much on something that’s hard to quantify in terms of value. It’s a tough sell to sink money into an effort to stop something that might one day happen, particularly for bootstrapped startups that must make every cent count — yet we’re told security is a crucial investment for a company’s future.

Sorry to break it to you, but there is no easy answer.

The reality is that each company is different and there is no single recommended dollar amount to spend. But it’s absolutely certain that some investment is required. We know because we see a lot of security incidents here at TechCrunch — hacks, breaches and especially data exposures, often a result of human error.

We spoke to three security experts — a head of security, a security entrepreneur and a cybersecurity fellow — to understand the questions facing startups.

Know and understand your threat model

Every company has a different threat model — by that, we mean identifying risks and possible ways of attack before they happen. Companies that store tons of user data may be a greater target than companies that don’t. Each firm needs to evaluate which kind of risks they face and identify weaknesses.

 


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How to identify and remove KidsGuard ‘stalkerware’ from your phone

21:00 | 20 February

We reported today on KidsGuard, a powerful mobile spyware. Not only is the app secretly installed on thousands of Android phones without the owners’ consent, it also left a server open and unprotected, exposing the data it siphoned off from victims’ infected devices to the internet.

This consumer-grade spyware also goes by “stalkerware.” It’s often used by parents to monitor their kids, but all too frequently it’s repurposed for spying on a spouse without their knowledge or consent. These spying apps are banned from Apple and Google’s app stores, but those bans have done little to curb the spread of these privacy invading apps, which can read a victim’s messages, listen to their phone calls, track their real-time locations, and steal their contacts, photos, videos, and anything else on their phones.

Stalkerware has become so reviled by privacy experts, security researchers, and lawmakers that antivirus makers have promised to do more to better detect the spyware.

TechCrunch obtained a copy of the KidsGuard app. Using a burner Android phone with the microphones and cameras sealed, we tested the spyware’s capabilities. We also uploaded the app to online malware scanning service VirusTotal, which runs uploaded files against dozens of different antivirus makers. Only eight antivirus engines flagged the sample as malicious — including Kaspersky, a member of the Coalition Against Stalkerware, and F-Secure.

Yoong Jien Chiam, a researcher at F-Secure’s Tactical Defense unit, analyzed the app and found it can obtain “GPS locations, account name, on-screen screenshots, keystrokes, and is also accessing photos, videos, and browser history.”

KidsGuard’s developer, ClevGuard, does not make it easy to uninstall the spyware. But this brief guide will help you to identify if the spyware is on your device and how to remove it.

Before you continue, some versions of Android may have slightly different menu options, and you take these following steps at your own risk. This only removes the spyware, and does not delete any data that was uploaded to the cloud.

How to identify the spyware

If you have an Android device, go to SettingsApps, then scroll down and see if “System Update Service” is listed. This is what ClevGuard calls the app to disguise it from the user. If you see it, it is likely that you are infected with the spyware.

First, remove the spyware as a “device administrator”

Go to Settings > Security, then Device administrators then untick the “System Update Service” box, then hit Deactivate.

Then remove the app’s “usage access”

Now, go back to Settings > Security then scroll to Apps with usage access. Once here, tap on “System Update Service” then switch off the permit usage toggle.

Also remove the spyware’s “notification access”

Once that is done, go back to Settings > Sound & notification then go to Notification access. Now switch off the toggle for “System Update Service.”

Now you can uninstall the spyware from your device

Following those steps, you have effectively disabled the spyware. Now you are able to uninstall it. Go to Settings > Apps and scroll down to “System Update Service.” You should be able to hit Uninstall, but you may need to hit Force Stop first. Tap OK to uninstall the app. This may take a few minutes.

Secure your device again

Now that you’ve ridden your device of the spyware, you’ll need to enable a couple of settings that were switched off when your device was first infected. Firstly, go back to Settings > Security then switch off the toggle for Unknown sources. Secondly, go to the Play Store > Play Protect. If you have the option, select Turn on. Once it’s on, you should check to ensure that it “Looks good.”

 


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A ‘stalkerware’ app leaked phone data from thousands of victims

21:00 | 20 February

A spyware app designed to “monitor everything” on a victim’s phone has been secretly installed on thousands of phones.

The app, KidsGuard, claims it can “access all the information” on a target device, including its real-time location, text messages, browser history, access to its photos, videos and app activities, and recordings of phone calls.

But a misconfigured serve meant the app was also spilling out the secretly uploaded contents of victims’ devices to the internet.

These consumer-grade spyware apps — also known as “stalkerware” — have come under increased scrutiny in recent years for allowing and normalizing surveillance, often secretly and without obtaining permission from their victims. Although many of these apps are marketed toward parents to monitor their child’s activities, many have repurposed the apps to spy on their spouses. That’s prompted privacy groups and security firms to work together to help better identify stalkerware.

KidsGuard is no different. Its maker, ClevGuard, pitches the spyware app as a “stealthy” way to keep children safe, but also can be used to “catch a cheating spouse or monitor employees.”

But the security lapse offers a rare insight into how pervasive and intrusive these stalkerware apps can be.

ClevGuard’s website, which makes the KidsGuard phone spyware (Image: TechCrunch)

TechCrunch obtained a copy of the Android app from Till Kottman, a developer who reverse-engineers apps to understand how they work.

Kottman found that the app was exfiltrating the contents of victims’ phones to an Alibaba cloud storage bucket — which was named to suggest that the bucket only stored data collected from Android devices. It’s believed the bucket was inadvertently set to public, a common mistake made — often caused by human error — nor was it protected with a password.

Using a burner Android device with the microphone sealed and the cameras covered, TechCrunch installed the app and used a network traffic analysis tool to understand what data was going in and out of the device — and was able to confirm Kottman’s findings.

The app, which has to be bought and downloaded from ClevGuard directly, can be installed in a couple of minutes. (ClevGuard claims it also supports iPhones by asking for iCloud credentials to access the contents of iCloud backups, which is against Apple’s policies.) The app has to be installed by a person with physical access to a victim’s phone, but the app does not require rooting or jailbreaking. The Android app also requires that certain in-built security features are disabled, such as allowing non-Google approved apps to be installed and disabling Google Play Protect, which helps to prevent malicious apps from running.

Once installed, ClevGuard says its app works in “stealth” and isn’t visible to the victim. It does that by masquerading itself as an Android “system update” app, which looks near-indistinguishable from legitimate system services.

And because there’s no app icon, it’s difficult for a victim to know their device has been compromised.

KidsGuard is designed to look like an Android app (Image: TechCrunch)

Because we only had the Android app and not a paid subscription to the service, we were limited in how much we could test. Through our testing, TechCrunch found that the app silently and near-continually siphons off content from a victim’s phone, including what’s stored in their photos and video apps, and recordings of the victim’s phone calls.

The app also gives whomever install the app access to who the victim is talking to and when on a variety of apps, such as WhatsApp, Instagram, Viber and Facebook Messenger, and the app also boasts the ability to monitor a victim’s activities on dating apps like Tinder. The app secretly takes screenshots of a victim’s conversations in apps like Snapchat and Signal to capture the messages before they are set to disappear.

The spyware app maker can also record and monitor the precise location of a device, and access their browsing history.

Although the app says it can access a victim’s contacts, the uploaded data stored in the exposed bucket did not include contact lists or easily identifiable information on the victim, making it difficult for TechCrunch to notify victims in bulk.

But one victim we spoke to said she found out just a few days earlier that spyware had been installed on her phone.

“It was my husband,” said the victim. The two had been separated, she said, but he was able to access her private messages by secretly installing the spyware on her phone. “I gave him the choice to show me how he was doing it or I was getting a divorce, so he finally showed me last night,” she said.

ClevGuard shut down the exposed cloud storage bucket after we contacted the company. We also contacted Alibaba, which also alerted the company of the exposure.

“This is evidence that not only are spouseware and stalkerware companies morally bankrupt, they are also often failing to protect their stolen user data once they have it,” said Cooper Quintin, senior staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, who also examined the app.

“The fact that this also includes the data of young children is both alarming and sickening,” said Quintin. “This one tiny company had around 3,000 infections worldwide, which lays bare the massive scope of the spouseware and stalkerware industry.”

It’s the latest in a long stream of spyware companies that have either had data breaches or exposed systems. Vice tech news site Motherboard has reported on many, including mSpy, Mobistealth and Flexispy. The Federal Trade Commission also launched legal action against one spyware app maker, Retina-X, which had two data breaches involving sensitive victim data.

If you think you are a victim of KidsGuard, this is how you can identify and remove the malware.


Got a tip? You can send tips securely over Signal and WhatsApp to +1 646-755–8849.

 


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A group of ex-NSA and Amazon engineers are building a ‘GitHub for data’

16:00 | 20 February

Six months ago or thereabouts, a group of engineers and developers with backgrounds from the National Security Agency, Google and Amazon Web Services had an idea.

Data is valuable for helping developers and engineers to build new features and better innovate. But that data is often highly sensitive and out of reach, kept under lock and key by red tape and compliance, which can take weeks to get approval. So, the engineers started Gretel, an early-stage startup that aims to help developers safely share and collaborate with sensitive data in real time.

It’s not as niche of a problem as you might think, said Alex Watson, one of the co-founders. Developers can face this problem at any company, he said. Often, developers don’t need full access to a bank of user data — they just need a portion or a sample to work with. In many cases, developers could suffice with data that looks like real user data.

“It starts with making data safe to share,” Watson said. “There’s all these really cool use cases that people have been able to do with data.” He said companies like GitHub, a widely used source code sharing platform, helped to make source code accessible and collaboration easy. “But there’s no GitHub equivalent for data,” he said.

And that’s how Watson and his co-founders, John Myers, Ali Golshan and Laszlo Bock came up with Gretel.

“We’re building right now software that enables developers to automatically check out an anonymized version of the data set,” said Watson. This so-called “synthetic data” is essentially artificial data that looks and works just like regular sensitive user data. Gretel uses machine learning to categorize the data — like names, addresses and other customer identifiers — and classify as many labels to the data as possible. Once that data is labeled, it can be applied access policies. Then, the platform applies differential privacy — a technique used to anonymize vast amounts of data — so that it’s no longer tied to customer information. “It’s an entirely fake data set that was generated by machine learning,” said Watson.

It’s a pitch that’s already gathering attention. The startup has raised $3.5 million in seed funding to get the platform off the ground, led by Greylock Partners, and with participation from Moonshots Capital, Village Global and several angel investors.

“At Google, we had to build our own tools to enable our developers to safely access data, because the tools that we needed didn’t exist,” said Sridhar Ramaswamy, a former Google executive, and now a partner at Greylock.

Gretel said it will charge customers based on consumption — a similar structure to how Amazon prices access to its cloud computing services.

“Right now, it’s very heads-down and building,” said Watson. The startup plans to ramp up its engagement with the developer community in the coming weeks, with an eye on making Gretel available in the next six months, he said.

 


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SentinelOne raises $200M at a $1.1B valuation to expand its AI-based endpoint security platform

19:30 | 19 February

As cybercrime continues to evolve and expand, a startup that is building a business focused on endpoint security has raised a big round of funding. SentinelOne — which provides a machine learning-based solution for monitoring and securing laptops, phones, containerised applications and the many other devices and services connected to a network — has picked up $200 million, a Series E round of funding that it says catapults its valuation to $1.1 billion.

The funding is notable not just for its size but for its velocity: it comes just eight months after SentinelOne announced a Series D of $120 million, which at the time valued the company around $500 million. In other words, the company has more than doubled its valuation in less than a year — a sign of the cybersecurity times.

This latest round is being led by Insight Partners, with Tiger Global Management, Qualcomm Ventures LLC, Vista Public Strategies of Vista Equity Partners, Third Point Ventures, and other undisclosed previous investors all participating.

Tomer Weingarten, CEO and co-founder of the company, said in an interview that while this round gives SentinelOne the flexibility to remain in “startup” mode (privately funded) for some time — especially since it came so quickly on the heels of the previous large round — an IPO “would be the next logical step” for the company. “But we’re not in any rush,” he added. “We have one to two years of growth left as a private company.”

While cybercrime is proving to be a very expensive business (or very lucrative, I guess, depending on which side of the equation you sit on), it has also meant that the market for cybersecurity has significantly expanded.

Endpoint security, the area where SentinelOne concentrates its efforts, last year was estimated to be around an $8 billion market, and analysts project that it could be worth as much as $18.4 billion by 2024.

Driving it is the single biggest trend that has changed the world of work in the last decade. Everyone — whether a road warrior or a desk-based administrator or strategist, a contractor or full-time employee, a front-line sales assistant or back-end engineer or executive — is now connected to the company network, often with more than one device. And that’s before you consider the various other “endpoints” that might be connected to a network, including machines, containers and more. The result is a spaghetti of a problem. One survey from LogMeIn, disconcertingly, even found that some 30% of IT managers couldn’t identify just how many endpoints they managed.

“The proliferation of devices and the expanding network are the biggest issues today,” said Weingarten. “The landscape is expanding and it is getting very hard to monitor not just what your network looks like but what your attackers are looking for.”

This is where an AI-based solution like SentinelOne’s comes into play. The company has roots in the Israeli cyberintelligence community but is based out of Mountain View, and its platform is built around the idea of working automatically not just to detect endpoints and their vulnerabilities, but to apply behavioral models, and various modes of protection, detection and response in one go — in a product that it calls its Singularity Platform that works across the entire edge of the network.

“We are seeing more automated and real-time attacks that themselves are using more machine learning,” Weingarten said. “That translates to the fact that you need defence that moves in real time as with as much automation as possible.”

SentinelOne is by no means the only company working in the space of endpoint protection. Others in the space include Microsoft, CrowdStrike, Kaspersky, McAfee, Symantec and many others.

But nonetheless, its product has seen strong uptake to date. It currently has some 3,500 customers, including three of the biggest companies in the world, and “hundreds” from the global 2,000 enterprises, with what it says has been 113% year-on-year new bookings growth, revenue growth of 104% year-on-year, and 150% growth year-on-year in transactions over $2 million. It has 500 employees today and plans to hire up to 700 by the end of this year.

One of the key differentiators is the focus on using AI, and using it at scale to help mitigate an increasingly complex threat landscape, to take endpoint security to the next level.

“Competition in the endpoint market has cleared with a select few exhibiting the necessary vision and technology to flourish in an increasingly volatile threat landscape,” said Teddie Wardi, MD of Insight Partners, in a statement. “As evidenced by our ongoing financial commitment to SentinelOne along with the resources of Insight Onsite, our business strategy and ScaleUp division, we are confident that SentinelOne has an enormous opportunity to be a market leader in the cybersecurity space.”

Weingarten said that SentinelOne “gets approached every year” to be acquired, although he didn’t name any names. Nevertheless, that also points to the bigger consolidation trend that will be interesting to watch as the company grows. SentinelOne has never made an acquisition to date, but it’s hard to ignore that, as the company to expand its products and features, that it might tap into the wider market to bring in other kinds of technology into its stack.

“There are definitely a lot of security companies out there,” Weingarten noted. “Those that serve a very specific market are the targets for consolidation.”

 


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Better know a CSO: Dropbox head of security Justin Berman

19:26 | 14 February

Justin Berman has one of the most important jobs at Dropbox .

As head of security, he oversees the company’s cybersecurity strategy, its defenses and works daily to keep its more than 600 million users’ data private and secure.

No pressure, then.

Berman joined the file storage and workspace giant a year ago during a period of transition for the company. During its early years, Dropbox was hit by a data breach that saw more than 60 million user passwords stolen during a time where tech giants were entrenched in a “move fast and break things” culture. But things have changed, particularly at Dropbox, which made good on its promise to improve the company’s security and also went far beyond what any Silicon Valley company had done before to better protect security researchers.

In this series, we’ll look at the role of the CSO — the chief security officer — at some of the biggest companies in tech to better understand the role, what it means to keep an organization secure without hindering growth and what advice startups can learn from some of the most experienced security professionals in the industry.

We start with Berman, who discussed in a recent interview what drew him to the company, what it means to be a security chief and what other companies can learn from Dropbox’s groundbreaking security policies

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

TechCrunch: You’ve been at Dropbox since June. Before this you were at Zenefits, Flatiron Health and Bridgewater. What brought you to Dropbox?

Justin Berman: First and foremost, I think the people here are amazing. And I think the problems I get to solve here are not the ones that a lot of security leaders find themselves solving. Because the company has had a historical commitment to security, privacy, and trust and risk, I’m not coming in and having to boot the culture of security from the ground up. That culture already exists. And the question we ask ourselves is how do we use that culture to do the right level of things as opposed to just doing as much as possible where you might slow down the business?

 


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PhotoSquared app exposed customer photos and shipping labels

18:38 | 14 February

Popular photo printing app PhotoSquared has exposed thousands of customer photos, addresses, and orders details.

At least ten thousand shipping labels were stored in a public Amazon Web Services (AWS) storage bucket. There was no password on the bucket, allowing anyone who knew the easy-to-guess web address access to the customer data. All too often, these AWS storage buckets are misconfigured and set to “public” and not “private.”

The exposed data included high-resolution user-uploaded photos and generated shipping labels, dating back to 2016 and was updating by the day. The app has more than 100,000 users, according to its Google Play listing.

It’s not known how long the storage bucket was left open.

One of the customer orders, including photos and the customer’s shipping address. The exposed storage bucket also had thousands of shipping labels. (Image: TechCrunch)

Security researchers provided the name of the exposed bucket to TechCrunch. We matched a number of shipping labels against existing public records, and contacted PhotoSquared on Wednesday to warn of the exposure.

Keith Miller, chief executive of Strategic Factory, which owns Photosquared, confirmed that the data was no longer exposed, but Miller declined to say if it planned to inform customers or regulators under data breach notification laws.

At the time of writing, PhotoSquared has made no reference to the security lapse on its website or its social media accounts.

 


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Develop a serious cybersecurity strategic plan that incorporates CCM

22:52 | 10 February

Robert R. Ackerman Jr. Contributor
Robert R. Ackerman Jr. is the founder and managing director of AllegisCyber, a venture capital firm specializing in cybersecurity, and the co-founder and executive at DataTribe, a cybersecurity startup foundry which focuses on launching startups based on cyber domain expertise from the intelligence community and national laboratories.

It’s a new year and corporate concerns about cybersecurity risk are high. Which means top executives at Fortune 500 companies will do what they always do — spend big on security technology. Global cybersecurity spending is on a path to exceed $1 trillion cumulatively over the five-year period from 2017 to 2021.

But increasing budgets each year with little strategic forethought is a corporate failing. Further, the lack of proactive monitoring of cyber risk profile almost ensures gaps and vulnerabilities that will be exploited by hackers.

Corporations that don’t formulate a thorough cybersecurity plan and monitor its implementation will encounter more breaches and increasingly become mired in scuttled M&A opportunities. Market research firm Gartner says that 60% of organizations engaging in M&A activity are already weighing a target’s cybersecurity track record, posture and strategy as a key factor in their due diligence. A company that has been hacked is a less attractive acquisition target — hardly a minor point, given that M&A activity globally, led by the U.S., has set records in recent years and is widely expected to maintain or exceed this level going forward.

The most highly publicized example of an M&A-related cybersecurity headache was Verizon’s discovery of a prior data breach at Yahoo a couple of years ago, after formulating an acquisition agreement. The discovery almost killed the deal and ultimately resulted in a $350 million reduction in Verizon’s purchase price.

Enterprises must step up to the plate once and for all and develop meaningful metrics to assess the quality of their cybersecurity protection and monitor its completeness and effectiveness. And the best way to do this is to begin taking steps to incorporate continuous controls monitoring (CCM).

 


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